Natural Extracts

  • Withania somnifera, also known as Ashwagandha Natural Extracts , Indian ginseng, Winter cherry, Ajagandha, Kanaje Hindi and Samm Al Ferakh, is a plant in Solanaceae or nightshade family.

    The main constituents of ashwagandha natural extracts are alkaloids and steroidal lactones. Among the various alkaloids, withanine is the main constituent. The other alkaloids are somniferine, somnine, somniferinine, withananine, pseudo-withanine, tropine, pseudo-tropine, 3-a-gloyloxytropane, choline, cuscohygrine, isopelletierine, anaferine and anahydrine. Two acyl steryl glucoside viz. sitoindoside VII and sitoindoside VIII have been isolated from root. The leaves contain steroidal lactones, which are commonly called withanolides.

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    Ashwagandha is also used as an “adaptogen” to help the body cope with daily stress, and as a general tonic. Its may improve thinking ability, decreasing pain and swelling (inflammation), and preventing the effects of aging.

    Ashwagandha may also help regulate blood sugar which aids in suppressing sugar cravings. Research shows ashwagandha may be a promising alternative for cancer treatment and prevention. Ashwagandha seems to show positive effects on the endocrine, cardiac, and central nervous systems. It is one herb that could help your body produce its own thyroid hormones.

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    • Hugh Scott & Kenneth Mason, Western Arabia and the Red Sea, Naval Intelligence Division: London 1946, p. 597 ISBN 0-7103-1034-X.
    • “Herbal Medicine in Yemen: Traditional Knowledge and Practice, and Their Value for Today’s World”. Ingrid Hehmeyer and Hanne Schönig. Islamic History and Civilization. 96. Leiden: Brill. 2012. p. 200. ISBN978-90-04-22150-5.
    • “Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal”. PROTA (Plant Resources of Tropical Africa / Ressources végétales de l’Afrique tropicale) [Online Database]. Wageningen, Netherlands: Gurib-Fakim A. and Schmelzer G. H. Retrieved 2012-08-07.
    • “Ashwagandha”. Drugs.com. 2009. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
    • Stearn, W. T. (1995). Botanical Latin: History, Grammar, Syntax, Terminology and Vocabulary (4th ed.). Timber Press. ISBN0-88192-321-4.

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  • Amla the Indian Gooseberry is a fruit which has fascinated the medico-research community due to its high medicinal value. Amla or Phyllanthus Emblica, also known as Emblic, Emblic Myrobalan, Mycrobalo, Malecca Tree etc is a major ingredient of globally accepted Ayurvedic preparations like Chyavanaprash and Triphala. It is a rich source of vitamin C, as low molecular weight hydrolyzable tannins containing a molecular fragment similar to ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are the active principles of Amla.

    Amla, with its high medicinal value is an active constituent of many Ayurvedic medicines used for effective treatment for various diseases including chronic ailments for over 5,000 years. All parts of this deciduous plant are used for a wide range of treatments. The tree is considered because of its outstanding therapeutic values.

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    • Hyperlipidemia
    • Reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides
    • Increases HDL Cholesterol
    • Atherosclerosis
    • Immuno-modulation
    • Increasing RBC, WBC, Lymphocytes and Hemoglobin

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  • Ginger for Health

    Ginger is well known for its ability to alleviate nausea and vomiting, but it boasts many other additional health benefits, extending from reducing pain and allergy symptoms to serving as a source of cancer-fighting antioxidant. A veritable host of ailments throughtout the body has shown a positive response to ginger.

    Ginger is commonly used as a digestive aid. For this reason, some may eat fresh ginger before a meal. Post-meal, ginger improves food and nutrient absorption. The ingredient is even known to reduce bloating and gas.

    Ginger also delivers anti-inflammatory and analgesic qualities, which may reduce the pain of arthritic joints, sore muscles, headaches, and menstrual cramps. The antioxidant properties of this herb have also shown an ability to kill cancer cells. In some regions, ginger juice is even used as a topical treatment for burns.

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    Cancers/Chemotherapy

    In a University of Michigan Medical School study, published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, 30 volunteers were randomly assigned to 2g of ginger root supplement or placebo for 28 days. Results showed a reduction in many inflammation markers, such as PGE2, in the colon. Because inflammatory of the colon is thought to be a precursor to colon cancer, reducing this inflammation may aid in preventing this type of cancer. read more…
    Results of a 2009 Phase II/III study conducted on 644 cancer patients at the University of Rochester Medical Centre showed that ginger supplements, taken with anti-vomiting drugs before a chemotherapy treatment, reduced lingering nausea by 40%. Since an estimated 70% of cancer patient experience nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy, ginger may provide welcome relief.

    Blood Glucose Levels

    A 2012 University of Sydney study, published in the natural products journal Planta Medica, investigated the ability of ginger to control blood glucose levels. Independent of insulin, ginger extracts were shown to increase the uptake of glucose into muscles cells, a significant area of glucose use in the body. read more… Much of the success was attributed to gingerols, the major phenolic components of the ginger rhizome-particularly the [6] and [8]-gingerols. Because glucose uptake to muscles in type 2 diabetes patients is markedly decreased due to impaired insulin signal transduction and inefficiency of the protein GLUT4, ginger could potentially help these patient manage blood sugar levels.

    Weight Management

    A 2012 pilot study, reported on in the journal Metabolism, indicates that consumption of a hot ginger beverage enhanced the thermic effect of food and promoted feelings of satiety, suggesting a potential role of ginger in weight management. read more…Research from the Netherlands also supports the notion that ginger helps accelerate metabolism and burn fat.
    Ginger has also been shown to exhibit cholesterol-lowering properties. A double-blind, controlled clinical trial at Iran’s Babol University of Medical Sciences compared the effects of ginger and placebo on cholesterol. Researchers found that including ginger powder in diets resulted in significantly reduced LDL cholesterol. Study participant who took ginger supplements also showed improvements in triglyceride levels.

    Inflammation

    Inflammation contributes to a host of health issues, and ginger once again is proving its worth here, too. read more… In comparing ginger extract to prescription anti-inflammatory drugs (cortisone and ibuprofen) for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, the authors of a December 2012 study in the journal Arthritis said “ginger extract was as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as betamethasone in [an] in vitro model.” And while cortisone has been linked to a litany of serious potential side effects, ginger was determined to be a powerful yet safe anti-inflammatory.

    Ginger Flavor

    The popularity of ginger in food and drink applications is on the rise, with ginger drawing accolades for its pungent, spicy flavor.

    Ginger is part of the Zingiberaceae family, along with cardamom and turmeric. Besides ginger’s rising popularity in the United States, its spicy taste and aromatic quality have made it a longtime favourite for dishes in India and China-two key producers of the world’s ginger supply. Ginger is also an important ingredient in Japanese, Korean, and Jamaican specialty cuisine, and it is popular in Africa and many countries of South Asia.

    A wide array of foods and beverages benefits from ginger’s distinctive flavor and taste. Candy, cake, cookies, soups, curries, sauces, wine, beer, liqueur, coffee, tea, and of course, ginger ale are all crafted with this fragrant herb.With its long, rich history that spans millennia and continents, ginger has proven itself as a wonderful herb-both for its therapeutic benefits that improve health and for its fresh and aromatic tang that is a feast for the senses.

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  • Lycopene may be the most powerful carotenoid quencher of singlet oxygen,  being 100 times more efficient in test tube studies of singlet-oxygen quenching  action than vitamin E, which in turn has 125 times the quenching action of  glutathione (water soluble). Singlet oxygen produced during exposure to  ultraviolet light is a primary cause of skin aging.Ongoing preliminary research suggests that lycopene is associated with reduced  risk of macular degenerative disease, serum lipid oxidation and cancers of the  lung, bladder, cervix and skin.

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  • Rauwolfia is a naturally occurring drug that has been used for centuries in ancient India. It is extracted from the root of Rauwolfia serpentina or Rauwolfia vomitoria, plants found in India and Africa. In traditional herbal medicine, the root was brewed as a tea and used in humans to treat hypertension, insanity, snakebite, and cholera. The purified alkaloid, reserpine, was isolated in 1952 and is considered the first modern drug for the treatment of hypertension. Reserpine irreversibly binds to the storage vesicles of neurotransmitters, particularly norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine. Eventually, catecholamine depletion occurs because of the body’s inability to store these neurotransmitters. It is an unusual drug; it takes many hours or days to reach full effect and continues to have some subtle sedating effects for many days after the last dose.

     

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  • Shilajit (Sanskrit: śilājatu) is a thick, sticky tar-like substance with a colour ranging from white to dark brown (the latter is more common), sometimes found in Caucasus mountains, Altai Mountains, and Tibet mountains and mountains of Gilkit Balistan.
    Shilajit is a blackish-brown exudation, of variable consistency, obtained from steep rocks of different formations found in the Altai Mountains.

    It is used in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine. It has been reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form, as well as triterpenes, humic acid and Fluvic Acid.

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    Shilajit is a substance mainly found in the Altai, Himalaya, and Caucasus mountains. The color range varies from a yellowish brown to pitch-black, depending on composition. For use in Ayurvedic medicine the black variant is considered the most potent.Shilajit has been described as ‘mineral oil’, ‘stone oil’ or ‘rock sweat’, as it seeps from cracks in mountains due mostly to the warmth of the sun. There are many local legends and stories about its origin, use and properties, often wildly exaggerated. It should not be confused with ozokerite, also a humic substance, similar in appearance, but apparently without medicinal qualities. In fact, neither of the substances, ozokerite nor shilajit possess any scientifically proven medicinal qualities.

    Once cleaned of impurities and extracted, shilajit is a homogeneous brown-black paste-like substance, with a glossy surface, a peculiar smell and bitter taste. Dry shilajit density ranges from 1.1 to 1.8 g/cm3. It has a plastic-like behavior, at a temperature lower than 20°C/68°F it will solidify and will soften when warmed. It easily dissolves in water without leaving any residue, and it will soften when worked between the fingers.

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  • Tribulus terrestris has long been a constituent in tonics in Indian ayurveda practice, where it is known by its Sanskrit name, “gokshura.”It is now being promoted as a booster for the purpose of increasing sex drive. Its use for this purpose originated in Eastern Europe in the 1970’s. It was popularized in America by 1970’s strong-man Jeffrey Petermann. Independent studies have suggested that Tribulus terrestris extract slightly increases hormone levels, though leaving them in the normal range.Some have compared the tonic properties of Tribulus terrestris to the effects of ginseng, but these occur due to entirely different mechanisms.

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